Humans Did Not Wipe Out the Neanderthals, New Research Suggests

archaeologicalnews:

image

Neanderthals went extinct in Europe about 40,000 years ago, giving them millennia to coexist with modern humans culturally and sexually, new findings suggest.

This research also suggests that modern humans did not cause Neanderthals to rapidly go extinct, as some researchers have previously…

Ancient pigeon bones reveal secrets of Neanderthals' bird diet

archaeologicalnews:

image

Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a new study has revealed.

Close examination of 1,724 bird bones in a cave in Gibraltar revealed cuts, human tooth marks and burns, according to research published in the…

'Welcome to the Future' Anthology Needs Futuristic Fiction Stories - Pays $100/story

writingcareer:

image

Christina Escamilla Publishing is accepting submissions for a forthcoming anthology called Welcome to the Future—a collection of futuristic-themed stories where innovation and technology (like talking computers, flying cars, bionic body parts, etc.) enhance life or now mindlessly control much of society and how humans think. Stories can be emotionally joyful and amusing or dismal, gloomy, and hopeless.

Read More

kaylapocalypse:

exorcist-taylor-kaine:

themalfoymistress:

ilikepotatoess:

m0iety:

Hyperstealth is a Canadian company that has recently developed a material that bends light waves around a target that allows for complete invisibility labeled “Quantum Stealth”. The material removes not only your visual, infrared (night vision) and thermal signatures but also the target’s shadow.

fucking canada made the invisibility cloak

image

Why would you name it “quantum stealth” when you could just name it “invisibility cloak”

clevergirlhelps:

Just a short way longer than expected post to get back into the swing of things. Contains:
Subgenres of the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic
Common tropes and cliches
Plot bunnies!
Music
Various links to fun things
Read More

clevergirlhelps:

Just a short way longer than expected post to get back into the swing of things. Contains:

  • Subgenres of the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic
  • Common tropes and cliches
  • Plot bunnies!
  • Music
  • Various links to fun things

Read More

wintherharlekin:

Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway)

Pictures:
Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen
Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer
Fossegrimen by http://birgitte-gustavsen.deviantart.com/art/Fossegrimen-160045627
Kraken by Bob Eggleton

10 Great Articles about the Apocalypse

tetw:

The best writing about the end of the world

Cyclops in a business suit, ironing; Take us to your leader; Dice man; Surfing, pirate, dinosaur breather; Mr Puffy arms rides a bike; Mr Kutupagan; Jellyfish band; Godzilla; Cristsilla. (Inside the mind of a 9 year old boy)

currentsinbiology:

Electroceuticals spark interest (Nature News)
When drugs can’t coax cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, or loosen arteries to reduce blood pressure, a well-placed jolt of electricity might do the trick. Spurred by decades of success with pacemakers and cochlear implants, and by advances in miniaturized technology, interest is surging in ‘electroceuticals’ — bioelectronic implants that stimulate nerves to treat disease.
Next week, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will announce a US$248-million effort to map the body’s electrical wiring and develop such devices. Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has already set up a similar programme — and biotechnology companies are on the verge of bringing products to market.
Nature 511,18 (03 July 2014)doi:10.1038/511018a
A microregulator implant made by SetPoint Medical is designed to stimulate nerves to reduce inflammation. Patrick T. Fallon

currentsinbiology:

Electroceuticals spark interest (Nature News)

When drugs can’t coax cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, or loosen arteries to reduce blood pressure, a well-placed jolt of electricity might do the trick. Spurred by decades of success with pacemakers and cochlear implants, and by advances in miniaturized technology, interest is surging in ‘electroceuticals’ — bioelectronic implants that stimulate nerves to treat disease.

Next week, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will announce a US$248-million effort to map the body’s electrical wiring and develop such devices. Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has already set up a similar programme — and biotechnology companies are on the verge of bringing products to market.

Nature 511,18 (03 July 2014)doi:10.1038/511018a

A microregulator implant made by SetPoint Medical is designed to stimulate nerves to reduce inflammation. Patrick T. Fallon

Scientists revise timeline of human origins

archaeologicalnews:

image

Many traits unique to humans were long thought to have originated in the genus Homo between 2.4 and 1.8 million years ago in Africa. Although scientists have recognized these characteristics for decades, they are reconsidering the true evolutionary factors that drove them.

A large brain, long…

Marketing your story using a Reverse Snowflake method

entropyalarm:

You may have heard of the Snowflake method for writing a story. It goes like this: write a sentence, expand it into a paragraph, expand it to several pages, and so forth.

I’m here to tell you how to reverse the process for marketing your already written story.

1) Summarize…