Mask Magazine Needs Stories for August Issue - Pays $80/story

writingcareer:

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Mask Magazine is accepting submissions for a special themed issue called SUBSTANCE(S)—stories about how we assess our intake of food, beverages, caffeine, and drugs as well as how we habitually enjoy it. Topics can include emotional eating, food obsessions, beverage toxicity paranoia, dieting compulsively, smoking addictions, etc.

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clevergirlhelps:

Just a short way longer than expected post to get back into the swing of things. Contains:
Subgenres of the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic
Common tropes and cliches
Plot bunnies!
Music
Various links to fun things
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clevergirlhelps:

Just a short way longer than expected post to get back into the swing of things. Contains:

  • Subgenres of the apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic
  • Common tropes and cliches
  • Plot bunnies!
  • Music
  • Various links to fun things

Read More

7 New Book Imprints for Authors and Agents

writingcareer:

I have compiled the newest book imprints that have either launched this year or will launch later in the year. For submission guidelines, visit the publisher’s website. In case the publisher has no formal guidelines online, request them via email. Usually on the publisher’s Contact Us page you will discover if the publisher is closed or open for submissions, and whom to contact.

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Harper Voyager, an established sci-fi/fantasy imprint of Harpercollins Publishers, has debuted its own sub-imprint called 31 Harper Voyager Impulse, which will publish digital first eBooks beginning this summer. The Impulse imprint will allow Harper Voyager to expand its reach into the digital space where younger readers demand more fan-based, fast-paced, action-driven ebooks.

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wintherharlekin:

Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway)

Pictures:
Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen
Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer
Fossegrimen by http://birgitte-gustavsen.deviantart.com/art/Fossegrimen-160045627
Kraken by Bob Eggleton

10 Great Articles about the Apocalypse

tetw:

The best writing about the end of the world

Cyclops in a business suit, ironing; Take us to your leader; Dice man; Surfing, pirate, dinosaur breather; Mr Puffy arms rides a bike; Mr Kutupagan; Jellyfish band; Godzilla; Cristsilla. (Inside the mind of a 9 year old boy)

Double Dragon Publishing Accepting Speculative Fiction Manuscripts for 2015 Release Schedule

writingcareer:

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Double Dragon Publishing, which has been publishing speculative fiction titles for more than a decade, is inviting authors to submit their unpublished sci-fi, fantasy or horror manuscript for publication as part of the company’s 2015 book release schedule.

Publisher Deron Douglas will also consider themes of time-travel, future fiction, gothic, magical realism, alternate history, and other spec fiction sub-genres. Manuscript length is usually under 40K words.

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currentsinbiology:

Electroceuticals spark interest (Nature News)
When drugs can’t coax cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, or loosen arteries to reduce blood pressure, a well-placed jolt of electricity might do the trick. Spurred by decades of success with pacemakers and cochlear implants, and by advances in miniaturized technology, interest is surging in ‘electroceuticals’ — bioelectronic implants that stimulate nerves to treat disease.
Next week, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will announce a US$248-million effort to map the body’s electrical wiring and develop such devices. Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has already set up a similar programme — and biotechnology companies are on the verge of bringing products to market.
Nature 511,18 (03 July 2014)doi:10.1038/511018a
A microregulator implant made by SetPoint Medical is designed to stimulate nerves to reduce inflammation. Patrick T. Fallon

currentsinbiology:

Electroceuticals spark interest (Nature News)

When drugs can’t coax cells in the pancreas to produce insulin, or loosen arteries to reduce blood pressure, a well-placed jolt of electricity might do the trick. Spurred by decades of success with pacemakers and cochlear implants, and by advances in miniaturized technology, interest is surging in ‘electroceuticals’ — bioelectronic implants that stimulate nerves to treat disease.

Next week, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will announce a US$248-million effort to map the body’s electrical wiring and develop such devices. Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has already set up a similar programme — and biotechnology companies are on the verge of bringing products to market.

Nature 511,18 (03 July 2014)doi:10.1038/511018a

A microregulator implant made by SetPoint Medical is designed to stimulate nerves to reduce inflammation. Patrick T. Fallon

Scientists revise timeline of human origins

archaeologicalnews:

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Many traits unique to humans were long thought to have originated in the genus Homo between 2.4 and 1.8 million years ago in Africa. Although scientists have recognized these characteristics for decades, they are reconsidering the true evolutionary factors that drove them.

A large brain, long…

Marketing your story using a Reverse Snowflake method

entropyalarm:

You may have heard of the Snowflake method for writing a story. It goes like this: write a sentence, expand it into a paragraph, expand it to several pages, and so forth.

I’m here to tell you how to reverse the process for marketing your already written story.

1) Summarize…

7 Book Publishers Actively Seeking Book Manuscripts from Authors

writingcareer:

The following book publishers have recently opened or announced their need for manuscript submissions from both emerging and professional authors.

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Intrigue Publishing (est. 2012)
Cheltenham, MD 20623
Denise Camacho, Publisher
Specialty: mystery and thriller novels

Current needs: Intrigue Publishing is now expanding into other genres and is reviewing manuscripts in Young Adult (YA), Crime Drama, Urban Drama and Sensual Romance. Manuscript length: 60K-100K words. The publisher pays competitive royalties, plus an advance against royalties depending on mass appeal.

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Tibetans Thrive at High Altitudes Thanks to Neanderthal Cousin

archaeologicalnews:

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Genetic mutations from an extinct human lineage help Tibetans and Sherpas live at high altitudes, researchers say.

The new findings add to growing evidence that interbreeding with other human lineages provided genetic variations that helped modern humans adapt as they spread across the world.